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A column by Huda Biuk
 
Huda is an American-born Libyan with a degree in Creative Writing and a minor in Communications.
She is the writer of The Bifocal.
 
The Bifocal Bids Farewell
Despite many readers’ appreciated appeals for the Bifocal’s articles to ‘keep on coming,’ it seems that the unfortunate time has come for the Bifocal to bid its readers farewell. While the past year and a half hasn’t been nothing short of an adventure, the Bifocalis coming to a prompt finale due to a personal decision to further my studies.

21 Ways Libya Changes You
Readers who follow the column may know that the Bifocal has, throughout this past year, continued to address cultural, societal and sometimes political issues that have an impact on Libyan society. I have been open about my views and experiences, being a Libyan who is relatively new to Libya; and have always geared articles each week to speak to both average Libyans, as well as Libyans who lived abroad.

Why Libyans Live Abroad
It has been my personal experience that Libyans of all walks of life share a special, nostalgic feeling toward their homeland. The reminder of home is prompted by things like red tea with floating mint leaves, or the sound of drumbeats and bagpipes playing to the traditional beat that perform in Libyan streets every day.

A Reminder of Our Sacrifices
National morale has suffered from recent assassinations and bomb attacks in Libya’s two largest cities. While many Libyans support the efforts that the democratically elected government is making and hope for their effectiveness, many people are deeply concerned as to how the declining security will affect the country.

A Tripoli Hot Spot
It is standard of every foreigner visiting Libya to ask the infamous question: where can I go to have a nice time, take a walk perhaps? But what every foreigner should know is that you already have something in common with the locals.

Ramadan in the Dark
It’s that lovely time of year when family and spirituality become the focal point of life as we know it. Preparations are made in the days leading up to the awaited new moon: mint is dried and minced, pantries are stocked with ingredients of the most favoured Ramadan recipes, and when it finally arrives friends and family congratulate each other on the arrival of Ramadan.

A Wedding in Tripoli (Part 8) – Finale
Here at the Bifocal, we’ve gone to great heights to take our readers on this journey, exploring every angle of a traditional Libyan wedding. Together, we’ve witnessed the rich customs and traditions that make up the intricacies of a wedding in Tripoli.

A Wedding in Tripoli (Part 7) - Zaffa
Continuing what has become the Bifocal's longest and most detailed series feature, it is finally the big day, the wedding party. It all counts down to this day, and although there is one other celebration the following day that celebrates the union of the families, this day is really all about the bride and groom.

A Wedding in Tripoli (Part 6) – Najma
This week in the Bifocal, the series on weddings in Tripoli continues. While we have covered a traditional engagement, the customs in a religious marriage contract signing and a traditional Sahriya, we have yet to cover the most custom-filled nights of all.

A Wedding in Tripoli (Part 5) – Sahriya
After the Fatiha ceremony, where the marriage contract is signed by a religious figure, the women celebrate the finalisation of the marriage. The bride changes into her first bridal ensemble – a traditional pink garment with layers including embellished sleeves and a woven silk wrap.

A Wedding in Tripoli (Part 4) – Fatiha
While many traditions in Tripoli weddings are regional customs, some are more universal. The religious ceremony, called the Fatiha as it is known in Libya, or Katib al Kitab in other Arab nations, is the marriage contract signing. It is a formal, but laid back ceremony where the marriage is legalised by a licensed sheikh.

A Wedding in Tripoli (Part 3) - Msadnat
To someone less familiar with weddings in Tripoli, it can be a bit ambiguous as to when the actual celebrations of a traditional wedding begin since there are multiple traditional ceremonies that celebrate the union of the couple.

A Wedding in Tripoli – Part 2 – The Byan
Last week in the Bifocal, we explored the customs and traditional practiced in a futhaniya, a ceremonial dinner attended by male family members of the bride and groom. The event symbolises the start of the union of the families, and is when agreements on the dowry and wedding date are made. Elders formally introduce themselves and take this opportunity to get to know each other better. This

A Traditional Wedding in Tripoli (Part 1)
Starting off this series on traditional weddings in Tripoli, it is important to note that while the Bifocal will focus on what is considered to be the ‘norm’, variations in tradition can always be found among families and communities with ties or origins from other parts of the country. That being said, let’s get started.

Celebrating a Year’s Mark at the Bifocal
As the author of the Bifocal, I would like to take this opportunity, on behalf of The Tripoli Post, to thank our dedicated readers for their continued investment and interaction with the column.

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The Bifocal Bids Farewell
Despite many readers’ appreciated appeals for the Bifocal’s articles to ‘keep on coming,’ it seems that the unfortunate time has come for the Bifocal to bid its readers farewell. While the past year and a half hasn’t been nothing short of an adventure, the Bifocalis coming to a prompt finale due to a personal decision to further my studies.

21 Ways Libya Changes You
Readers who follow the column may know that the Bifocal has, throughout this past year, continued to address cultural, societal and sometimes political issues that have an impact on Libyan society. I have been open about my views and experiences, being a Libyan who is relatively new to Libya; and have always geared articles each week to speak to both average Libyans, as well as Libyans who lived abroad.

 

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